Linguistics courses

LING 1010 Swahili
Swahili
This course provides an introduction to the Swahili language and culture. The primary goal of the course is to provide the students with the spoken knowledge of the language. However, by the end of the course, students should have also acquired some knowledge of reading and writing in the language and its structure.
credit hours: 3

LING 1010 Elementary American Sign Language I
Elementary American Sign Language I
The purpose of this course is to enable students to acquire introductory knowledge of American Sign Language. A linguistic, communicative, and cultural approach will allow students to explore this visual-spatial language used by up to two million people in the United States. Instruction will focus on the development of receptive and expressive signing skills and on the acquisition of the fundamentals of applied grammar.
credit hours: 3

LING 1015 Elementary American Sign Language II
Elementary American Sign Language II
Continuation of Elementary American Sign Language I, with focus on the expansion of vocabulary, a deepening of the understanding of grammatical structures, and the further development of communicative skills. Prerequisite: Elementary American Sign Language I.
Pre-requistites: Prerequisite: Elementary American Sign Language I
credit hours: 3

LING 2010 Intermediate American Sign Language
Intermediate American Sign Language
Continuation of intermediate/advanced study in American Sign Language, with focus on the expansion of vocabulary, conversational skills, demonstrative skills, and receptive skills in a seminar setting. Use of grammatical structure in natural and informative settings and the further development of communicative skills. Prerequisite: Elementary American Sign Language II
Pre-requistites: Prerequisite: Elementary American Sign Language II
credit hours: 3

LING 3000 Language Revitalization: The case of Tunica, Louisiana's Sleeping Language
Language Revitalization: The case of Tunica, Louisiana's Sleeping Language
Tulane has been collaborating with the Tunica tribe of Louisiana to bring back their language, the last speaker, Sesostrie Youchigant having died over fifty years ago. This course addresses the processes of language death, as well as methods and initiatives for language revitalization. Students will learn effective second language teaching methods and elementary Tunica. They will then apply what they have learned, serving as teaching assistants during the tribe's Language Summer Camp. The Tunica tribe will host the course in Marksville for the week of the Summer Camp. This course counts as a second tier service learning course.
credit hours: 3

LING 3010 Semantics, the Study of Meaning
Semantics, the Study of Meaning
What does the word cat mean? This course looks at three answers. One says that cat is just the set of all cats. Another says that cat refers to a prototypical cat, one described by the characteristics common to all the cats that you have ever seen. The third answer says that cat is the word that the brain associates with the cats that you saw when you were younger. Each of these answers assumes that the mind works in a certain way, so the right one tells us something about how the mind works in situations that have nothing to do with the meaning of cat
credit hours: 3

LING 3430 Semantics of Natural Language
Semantics of Natural Language
An introduction to the study of meaning in natural languages. The central techniques involve extending the methods of logical semantics for formal languages. No prerequisites, but prior exposure either to generative grammar (e.g., ANTH 3590) or symbolic logic (e.g., PHIL 1210) would not be wasted.
credit hours: 3

LING 3700 Second Language Acquisition
Second Language Acquisition
This course is intended to familiarize students with the field of Second Language Acquisition, including a history of the field's origins. Discussion of recent theories of second language acquisition and an overview of approaches to research methodology in this field.
credit hours: 3

LING 3810 Special Topics in Linguistics
Special Topics in Linguistics
Special topics in linguistics. For description consult the director. Other departments offer courses with linguistic import as well.
Notes: These courses may count toward the major upon consultation with the Program Adviser.
credit hours: 3

LING 3820 Special Topics in Linguistics
Special Topics in Linguistics
Special topics in linguistics. For description consult the director. Other departments offer courses with linguistic import as well.
Notes: These courses may count toward the major upon consultation with the Program Adviser.
credit hours: 3

LING 3890 Service Learning
Service Learning
Students complete a service activity in the community in conjunction with the content of a three-credit corequisite course.
Pre-requistites: Departmental approval.
credit hours: 0

LING 4110 Brain and Language
Brain and Language
The goal of this course is to learn how the brain is organized to produce and comprehend language and to understand linguistic disorders attendant on brain damage. There is an optional service learning component in which students can work with a speech therapist at a local health-care provider.
Notes: Can be used to satisfy the capstone for majors when co-registered in LING 5110.
credit hours: 3

LING 4120 Brain and Language
Brain and Language
Brain and Language touches on all of the subfields of linguistic analysis (syntax, semantics, phonology, morphology, pragmatics, and discourse) as they are affected by brain lesions and disease and thus qualifies as an excellent opportunity for the Linguistics.
credit hours: 3

LING 4560 Linguistics Internship
Linguistics Internship
Internships with Community Partners to develop language and linguistic resources. Experiences may include language teaching, materials development, web-design and curricular innovation.
credit hours: 1-3

LING 4570 Linguistics Internship
Linguistics Internship
Internships with Community Partners to develop language and linguistic resources. Experiences may include language teaching, materials development, web-design and curricular innovation.
credit hours: 1-3

LING 4720 Translation Studies Theory and History
Translation Studies Theory and History
This course is an exploration of the development of the field of Translation, from Ancient Civilization through the twenty-first century, with a heavy emphasis on primary source commentaries on translation produced by translators over time. Students should expect to study the writings and historical context of such translators as Cicero (100-43 BCE), St. Jerome (4th century AD), Erasmus (1500s), Martin Luther (1520s-1530s), Etienne Dolet (1540s), Friedrich Schleiermacher (1813), Walter Benjamin (1923), Roman Jakobson (1959), Eugene Nida (1960s), Miguel Leon Portilla (20th century Mexico), Jacques Derrida (responding to Jakobson), Lawrence Venuti (1990s), and Dennis Tedlock (1990s) and complete a comparative analysis of multiple versions of a translation of a text of their choosing.
Notes: Writing Practica Option.
credit hours: 3

LING 4810 Special Topics in Linguistics
Special Topics in Linguistics
Notes: Can be repeated for credit.
credit hours: 3

LING 4820 Special Topics in Linguistics
Special Topics in Linguistics
Notes: May be repeated for credit.
credit hours: 3

LING 4850 Proseminar in Linguistics
Proseminar in Linguistics
This course will examine a topic within linguistics, integrating the various levels of linguistic analysis: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. Students will be asked to apply linguistic theory to data within their field of concentration, synthesizing materials from primary and secondary sources.
Notes: This course counts as a capstone experience for the linguistics major. To receive capstone credit students must co-register for LING 5110.
credit hours: 3

LING 5110 Capstone
Capstone
credit hours: 0

LING 6070 Languages and Linguistics of Japan
Languages and Linguistics of Japan
This course is meant to give students a better understanding of the phonetic, phonologic, morphologic, syntactic, semantic, historical, political, and sociological aspects of spoken and written languages in Japan. While the majority of the focus will be on modern written and spoken forms of Japanese, students will also be introduced to bungo (Classical Japanese), as well as kanbun (Chinese used by people in Japan), Ainu Itak, Ryukyuan, Korean, and localized English creoles. In doing so, we will analyze unique and shared features of these languages, while familiarizing ourselves with basic notions and terminology used in Japanese linguistics. Learners of the Japanese language will benefit from this course by gaining a better understanding of linguistic features and learning about how society and history have transformed the languages of Japan. The course will be taught primarily in English, however the prerequisites include an introductory course in linguistics and/or rudimentary knowledge of Japanese and modern phonetic scripts (katakana and hiragana). Significant emphasis will be placed on reading, processing, and discussing academic works on language. Each week two or three students will be asked to present the readings for that week, before we go into a discussion. Grades will be based on presentations of readings and a final research paper of 18-25 pages in length.
Pre-requistites: ANTH 1030 and/or ASTJ 1010 or equivalent.
credit hours: 3

LING 6810 Special Topics in Linguistics
Special Topics in Linguistics
Special topics in linguistics. For description consult the director.
credit hours: 3

LING 6820 Special Topics in Linguistics
Special Topics in Linguistics
Special topics in linguistics. For description consult the director.
credit hours: 3

LING H4910 Independent Studies
Independent Studies
credit hours: 3

LING H4920 Independent Studies
Independent Studies
credit hours: 3

LING H4990 Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
Thesis may involve field study as well as intensive reading and research in a selected subfield within linguistics.
Pre-requistites: Approval of program director and course director.
credit hours: 3

LING H5000 Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
Thesis may involve field study as well as intensive reading and research in a selected subfield within linguistics.
Pre-requistites: Approval of program director and course director.
credit hours: 3