Physics courses

ENGP 3370 Processing of Biomaterials
Processing of Biomaterials
Processing of biomaterials gives an overview of the most advanced techniques to process biomaterials into structures that satisfy next generation applications. All materials classes will be covered including polymers, ceramics, metals, composites and cells and tissues. In each case, the material-specific processing and the properties and potential applications will be covered.
credit hours: 3

ENGP 3950 Engineers for International Development
Engineers for International Development
Engineers for International Development at Tulane University exists for students to participate in community-driven development programs worldwide through the design and implementation of sustainable engineering projects, while fostering responsible leadership. We work both internationally and locally to build and educate communities about their basic infrastructure systems such as drinking water, sanitation, and safe homes.
credit hours: 3

MPEN 6370 Processing of Biomaterials
Processing of Biomaterials
Processing of biomaterials gives an overview of the most advanced techniques to process biomaterials into structures that satisfy next generation applications. All materials classes will be covered including polymers, ceramics, metals, composites and cells and tissues. In each case, the material-specific processing and the properties and potential applications will be covered.
credit hours: 3

MPEN 6950 Engineers for International Development
Engineers for International Development
Engineers for International Development at Tulane University exists for students to participate in community-driven development programs worldwide through the design and implementation of sustainable engineering projects, while fostering responsible leadership. We work both internationally and locally to build and educate communities about their basic infrastructure systems such as drinking water, sanitation, and safe homes.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 1010 Great Ideas in Science and Technology
Great Ideas in Science and Technology
For non-scientists. Basic principles of science, applications and their relevance to our world. Typically includes astronomy, universe, Newtonian mechanics, energy and applications, symmetry in nature, order and disorder, electricity and applications, quantum mechanics, atoms and molecules, DNA, computer technology, and ethical issues. Laboratory.
credit hours: 4

PHYS 1050 Physics for Architects
Physics for Architects
A non-calculus course in classical physics stressing the fundamental physical laws and their application to architecture. Main topics include Newtonian mechanics with an emphasis on equilibrium applications, elasticity, fluids, and thermal processes. Credit not given for PHYS 1050 and PHYS 1210 or 1310. Does not count towards the B.S. Physics or B.S.E. Engineering Physics degrees.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 1210 Introductory Physics I
Introductory Physics I
A non-calculus course in classical physics stressing the fundamental physical laws. Newtonian mechanics, oscillations, and classical waves normally are treated in 1210. A weekly laboratory is included; the laboratory includes a review of techniques of problem solving, as well as experiments in classical physics. Not open for credit to students who have completed 1310. Does not count towards the B.S. Physics or B.S.E. Engineering Physics degrees.
credit hours: 4

PHYS 1220 Introductory Physics II
Introductory Physics II
A continuation of 1210. Electricity and magnetism, optics, and thermal phenomena. A weekly laboratory is included. Not open for credit to students who have completed 1320. Does not count towards the B.S. Physics or B.S.E. Engineering Physics degrees.
credit hours: 4

PHYS 1310 General Physics I
General Physics I
Prior or concurrent study in calculus is required. A calculus-based course in classical physics designed primarily for physical science and engineering majors. Newtonian mechanics, oscillations, and classical wave motion are studied. Emphasis is on understanding basic principles and solving problems. A weekly laboratory is included. The laboratory includes a review of techniques for problem solving, as well as experiments in classical physics.
credit hours: 4

PHYS 1320 General Physics II
General Physics II
A continuation of 1310. Electricity and magnetism, optics, and topics in modern physics, including the quantum theory of the atom and special relativity. Weekly laboratory.
credit hours: 4

PHYS 2350 Modern Physics I
Modern Physics I
Quantitative treatment of important topics of 20th-century physics, focused on special relativity and introductory quantum physics. Planck's and de Broglie's hypotheses, photons, the Bohr model, introduction to wave mechanics, the hydrogen atom, spatial quantization, spin, exclusion principle, multi-electron atoms.
Pre-requistites: PHYS 1210 and 1220 or 1310 and 1320, MATH 1210 and 1220 or equivalent.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 2360 Modern Physics II
Modern Physics II
An overview of the major fields in modern physics. Quantum statistics. Diatomic molecules, electrons in metals, band theory of solids, superconductivity, properties of nuclei, radioactivity, nuclear reactions, interaction of particles with matter, elementary particles, the standard model and cosmology.
Pre-requistites: PHYS 2350.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 2910 Introduction to Physics Pedagogy
Introduction to Physics Pedagogy
Introduction to the theory and practice of teaching physics courses through workshops, observations and assisting teachers at local schools with lectures and/or classroom demonstrations.
Pre-requistites: PHYS 1210 and 1220 or 1310 and 1320.
credit hours: 1

PHYS 3010 Theoretical Physics
Theoretical Physics
An introduction to the methods of theoretical physics emphasizing modern mathematical techniques, numerical methods using computers, and computer algebra.
Pre-requistites: PHYS 2350 and 11 credits of mathematics, or approval of instructor.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 3050 Spectroscopy of Solids and Atoms
Spectroscopy of Solids and Atoms
This course deals with the interaction of photons with matter. Topics will include some of the ideas of quantum electrodynamics that form the basic underpinning of all forms of electromagnetic interactions with matter. Absorption, reflection, and scattering of radiation in the spectral region extending from the infrared to the x-ray region of the spectrum will be described and will include experimental methods used to study gases and condensed matter materials. Emphasis will be given to photoionization, autoionization, Raman, Compton, Bragg, and Rayleigh scattering, and how these phenomena are used to study the electronic properties of matter. Sources, including lasers and synchrotron radiation, and instrumentation for their use will be discussed.
Pre-requistites: PHYS 1310, 1320, 2350, 2360, or consent of instructor.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 3150 Introduction to Neutron Science
Introduction to Neutron Science
An introduction to the theory and applications of neutron scattering, neutron optics, neutron interferometry and neutron beta decay. This course explores the many uses of thermal and cold neutron beams to study condensed matter, nuclear, molecular and biological systems; test fundamental principles of quantum mechanics and advance the frontier of particle physics.
Pre-requistites: MATH 2210, MATH 2240 or equivalent; PHYS 2350-2360 or equivalent.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 3170 Computational Physics and Engineering
Computational Physics and Engineering
An introduction to the use of computational methods in physics and engineering. Writing computer code and using data visualization techniques to help solve experimental and theoretical problems. Data analysis and modeling, Monte Carlo simulations, numerical differentiation and integration, ordinary and partial differential equations, electrostatics nonlinear dynamics and chaos, fast Fourier transform, noisy signal processing, quantum spectra, thermodynamics.
Pre-requistites: PHYS 2350 and MATH 2210 or 2240.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 3210 Molecular Biophysics and Polymer Physics
Molecular Biophysics and Polymer Physics
An introduction to the physics of polymers and the physical bases underlying the biofunctionality of macromolecules in living systems. Themes of molecular self-organization, conformation, complementarity, and information content are emphasized and related to protein, lipid, and nucleic acid structure and processes. Introduction to scattering and other spectroscopic techniques.
Pre-requistites: PHYS 2350 or equivalent, CHEM 1070 or equivalent, and MATH 1220 or equivalent.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 3230 Quantum Information Science and Engineering
Quantum Information Science and Engineering
This survey course introduces students to the new world of quantum information, quantum communication, and quantum computing.  The course is intended for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students in physics, engineering, and mathematics.  Topics include:  Quantum states, operators, and linear algebra; Bits and qubits; Ensembles and density operators; Unitary transformations; Gates and circuits; Information and entropy; POVM measurement; Multipartite systems; Bell inequality, Bell states, and non-locality; Measures of entanglement; Quantum communication and cryptography; Teleportation; Superdense coding; Quantum noise and error correction; Classical and quantum computational complexity; Quantum algorithms; Deutsch-Jozsa, Grover, Shor; DiVincenzo criteria; Physical realizations of quantum computers:  trapped ions, solid state qubits; Quantum optics and quantum internet; Topological quantum computation; Quantum biology.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 3370 Processing of Biomaterials
Processing of Biomaterials
Processing of biomaterials gives an overview of the most advanced techniques to process biomaterials into structures that satisfy next generation applications. All materials classes will be covered including polymers, ceramics, metals, composites and cells and tissues. In each case, the material-specific processing and the properties and potential applications will be covered.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 3450 Elementary Particle Physics
Elementary Particle Physics
An introduction to modern elementary particle physics, with an emphasis on the Standard Model, its phenomenology, and dynamics. The Standard Model explains, in principle and with remarkable success, virtually all phenomena that are observed in nature except gravity. The course begins with a qualitative examination of the electromagnetic, strong, and weak interactions and an introduction to the elementary particles through the use of Feynman diagrams. This is followed by relativistic kinematics, the quantum theory of angular momentum and spin, discrete symmetries, and bound states of leptons and quarks, with a focus on the hadrons. Finally the Dirac equation, the Feynman calculus, and the mathematical tools needed to calculate basic decay lifetimes and cross sections involving the electromagnetic and weak interactions are developed and applied.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 3530 Advanced Laboratory
Advanced Laboratory
Advanced experiments in modern physics, particularly nuclear physics, emphasizing research techniques and analysis of data using computers.
Pre-requistites: PHYS 2350 or approval of instructor.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 3600 Nanoscience and Technology
Nanoscience and Technology
Nanoscience and technology is often branded the science of the 21st century. It has been promised that nanotechnology will have similar stimulating effects on the world's economy and society as the industrial-and microelectronics- revolution. Nanoscience is an interdisciplinary effort with the aim to manipulate and control matter at length scales down to single molecules and atoms and thus to create materials and devices with novel properties. With diminishing dimensions material properties are being governed by quantum mechanics. The description and exploitation of quantum phenomena in novel devices is the quintessence of nanophysics. Consequently, the main emphasis of this course is to give an overview of the physics of low dimensional solid state systems. This course is supplementary to courses in solid state physics and surface science but can be taken independently.
Pre-requistites: PHYS 2350.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 3630 Electromagnetic Theory
Electromagnetic Theory
Electrostatic fields in a vacuum, dielectric materials, solutions to Laplace's and Poisson's equations, currents, magnetic fields, vector potentials, electromagnetic induction, relation to Special Relativity, Maxwell's equations, and the properties of classical electromagnetic waves.
Pre-requistites: PHYS 1310, 1320, and Mathematics 2210 or equivalent.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 3700 Electronic Properties of Materials
Electronic Properties of Materials
Quantum physics, electronics and energy bands in crystals, electronic transport in materials, photoconductivity, Hall effect, quantum Hall effect, superconductors and their applications, magnetic properties of material and their applications, thermal properties of materials and dielectric properties of materials.
Pre-requistites: PHYS 2350/2360 or instructor approval.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 3740 Classical Mechanics
Classical Mechanics
Newtonian mechanics, oscillations, central force motion, special theory of relativity, dynamics of rigid bodies, and the Lagrangian formulation of classical mechanics.
Pre-requistites: PHYS 1310, 1320, and MATH 2210.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 3800 PHYS/ENGP 3800 Colloquia (1)
PHYS/ENGP 3800 Colloquia (1)
A series of undergraduate and faculty seminars emphasizing topics and points of view not covered in the standard curriculum, but which are nonetheless important to the education of a physicist.
Notes: Required of all majors.
Pre-requistites: Junior standing or departmental approval.
credit hours: 1

PHYS 3880 Writing Practicum
Writing Practicum
Notes: Does not count toward Physics courses or electives for the Physics major.
Pre-requistites: Successful completion of the First-Year Writing Requirement.
Co-requisites: Three-credit departmental course.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 3910 Special Topics in Physics
Special Topics in Physics
Special topics in physics depending upon faculty and student interest.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 4230 Thermal Physics
Thermal Physics
A study of the physical properties of matter where temperature is an important variable. The laws of thermodynamics, equations of state, thermodynamic potentials. Kinetic theory of gases. Elementary statistical postulates. Ensembles, the partition function. Entropy, phase transitions.
Pre-requistites: PHYS 1210 and 1220, or 1310 and 1320.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 4470 Introductory Quantum Mechanics
Introductory Quantum Mechanics
The postulates of quantum mechanics, Schroedinger equation, operator methods, angular momentum, fermion and boson systems, and Heisenberg formulations, applications to simple physical systems.
Pre-requistites: PHYS 2350 and MATH 2210.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 4650 Optics
Optics
Geometrical, physical and quantum optics, with an emphasis on the classical electromagnetic aspects of optics pertaining to scattering, reflection, refraction, dispersion, polarization and interference. Applications to optical instruments, spectroscopy, interferometry, and Fourier optics.
Pre-requistites: PHYS 1210 and 1220, or 1310 and 1320, integral and differential calculus, PHYS 3630 recommended but not required.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 4880 Writing Intensive: ENGP 4310
Writing Intensive: ENGP 4310
credit hours: 3

PHYS 4910 Independent Studies
Independent Studies
Notes: Fulfills the capstone requirement for majors if student co-registers in PHYS 5110.
Pre-requistites: Approval of instructor and chair of department.
credit hours: 1-3

PHYS 4920 Independent Studies
Independent Studies
Notes: Fulfills the capstone requirement for majors if student co-registers in PHYS 5110.
Pre-requistites: Approval of instructor and chair of department.
credit hours: 1-3

PHYS 5110 Capstone
Capstone
credit hours: 0

PHYS 6010 Theoretical Physics I
Theoretical Physics I
Mathematical techniques used in theoretical physics. Topics include partial differential equations, orthogonal coordinate systems, separation of variables, introduction to ordinary differential equations, series solutions and convergence; Sturm Liouville theory, eigensystems and orthogonal functions; complex variables, Taylor and Laurent series, contour integration, integration by steepest descents, and conformal mappings.
Pre-requistites: Approval of instructor.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 6020 Theoretical Physics II
Theoretical Physics II
A continuation of Physics 6010. Calculus of variations, Rayleigh Ritz technique, Bessel and Legendre functions, Fourier series, Fourier and Laplace transforms, Green functions. An introduction to group theory and symmetry.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 6070 Astrophysics
Astrophysics
Fundamentals of stellar atmospheres and interiors: nuclear astrophysics, energy generation in stars, stellar evolution, nucleo-synthesis, and theories of supernovae. Gravitational collapse and properties of superdense stars. Galactic structure and evolution, elements of cosmology.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 6080 Surface Science
Surface Science
Introduction to current topics of surface and interface physics and applications. Methods and techniques of modern surface science, experimental requirements and applications. Concepts of two-dimensional physics and chemistry, properties of surfaces and model systems.
Pre-requistites: Approval of instructor.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 6150 Introduction to Neutron Science
Introduction to Neutron Science
An introduction to the theory and applications of neutron scattering, neutron optics, neutron interferometry and neutron beta decay. This course explores the many uses of thermal and cold neutron beams to study condensed matter, nuclear, molecular and biological systems; test fundamental principles of quantum mechanics and advance the frontier of particle physics.
Pre-requistites: MATH 2210, MATH 2240 or equivalent; PHYS 2350-2360 or equivalent.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 6170 Computational Physics and Engineering
Computational Physics and Engineering
An introduction to the use of computational methods in physics and engineering. Writing computer code and using data visualization techniques to help solve experimental and theoretical problems. Data analysis and modeling, Monte Carlo simulations, numerical differentiation and integration, ordinary and partial differential equations, electrostatic nonlinear dynamics and chaos, fast Fourier transform, noisy signal processing, quantum spectra, thermodynamics.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 6210 Molecular Biophysics and Polymer Physics
Molecular Biophysics and Polymer Physics
See PHYS 3210 for description.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 6230 Quantum Information Science and Engineering
Quantum Information Science and Engineering
This survey course introduces students to the new world of quantum information, quantum communication, and quantum computing. The course is intended for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students in physics, engineering, and mathematics. Topics include: Quantum states, operators, and linear algebra; Bits and qubits; Ensembles and density operators; Unitary transformations, Gates and circuits; Information and entropy; POVM measurement; Multipartite systems; Bell inequality; Bell states and non-locality; Measures of entanglement: Quantum communication and cryptography; Teleportation, Superdense coding; Quantum noise and error correction; Classical and quantum computational complexity; Quantum algorithms; Deutsch-Jozsa, Grover, Shor; DiVincenzo criteria; Physical realizations of quantum computers; trapped ions, solid state qubits; Quantum optics and quantum internet; Topological quantum computation; Quantum biology.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 6250 The Standard Model
The Standard Model
Unification of the strong, weak, and electro-magnetic interactions, based on the U(1) x SU(2) x SU(3) gauge group. Introduction to quantum field theory and the Feynman rules. Gauge invariance and non-Abelian Gauge Theories. The Standard Model Lagrangian. Electroweak theory and quantum chromodynamics. Masses and the Higgs mechanism. W and Z boson widths and decay channels. Quarks, gluons, confinement, and jets. Mesons, baryons, and glueballs. The Higgs boson. Running coupling constants in QED and QCD. Quark mixing angles, CP violation, and KM matrix. Beyond the Standard Model: grand unification, supersymmetry, supergravity, and superstrings.
Pre-requistites: PHYS 4470.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 6300 General Relativity
General Relativity
Review of special relativity. Tensor analysis. Differential forms and manifolds. Geodesics and curvature two-forms. The metric tensor. The stress-energy tensor and the Einstein equations. The initial data problem. The Schwarzschild and Kerr solutions: classical black holes. Elementary relativistic cosmology. Generation and detection of gravitational waves. Experimental tests of general relativity: the PPN formalism. Global techniques and the Hawking-Penrose singularity theorems. Hawking radiation and the Bekenstein bound.
Pre-requistites: PHYS 6020 or PHYS 2350 and MATH 2210.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 6450 Elementary Particle Physics
Elementary Particle Physics
An introduction to modern elementary particle physics, with an emphasis on the Standard Model, its phenomenology, and dynamics. The Standard Model explains, in principle and with remarkable success, virtually all phenomena that are observed in nature except gravity. The course begins with a qualitative examination of the electromagnetic, strong, and weak interactions and an introduction to the elementary particles through the use of Feynman diagrams. This is followed by relativistic kinematics, the quantum theory of angular momentum and spin, discrete symmetries, and bound states of leptons and quarks, with a focus on the hadrons. Finally the Dirac equation, the Feynman calculus, and the mathematical tools needed to calculate basic decay lifetimes and cross sections involving the electromagnetic and weak interactions are developed and applied.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 6600 Nanoscience and Technology
Nanoscience and Technology
Nanoscience and technology is often branded the science of the 21st century. It has been promised that nanotechnology will have similar stimulating effects on the world's economy and society as the industrial-and microelectronics- revolution. Nanoscience is an interdisciplinary effort with the aim to manipulate and control matter at length scales down to single molecules and atoms and thus to create materials and devices with novel properties. With diminishing dimensions material properties are being governed by quantum mechanics. The description and exploitation of quantum phenomena in novel devices is the quintessence of nanophysics. Consequently, the main emphasis of this course is to give an overview of the physics of low dimensional solid state systems. This course is supplementary to courses in solid state physics and surface science but can be taken independently.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 6700 Electronic Properties of Materials
Electronic Properties of Materials
Quantum physics, electronics and energy bands in crystals, electronic transport in materials, photoconductivity, Hall effect, quantum Hall effect, superconductors and their applications, magnetic properties of material and their applications, thermal properties of materials and dielectric properties of materials.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 6750 Modern Cosmology
Modern Cosmology
The Friedmann cosmological models: open, flat, and closed; matter and radiation dominated. The cosmological constant. Three degree blackbody radiation and its theoretical implications. Experimental tests in cosmology. Nucleosynthesis and galaxy formation. Anisotropic and inhomogeneous cosmologies: the Bianchi models, primarily Kasner and Type IX. GUTs in the very early universe: baryogenesis and phase transitions. Dark matter. Cosmic strings and magnetic monopoles. Inflationary models. Chaotic inflation. Future history and final state of the universe.
Pre-requistites: PHYS 4230, 6250, and 6300.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 7060 Theoretical Mechanics
Theoretical Mechanics
Advanced studies of theoretical mechanics. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian methods. Integrable and non-integrable problems.
Pre-requistites: Bachelor's degree in physics or permission of instructor.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 7100 Statistical Mechanics
Statistical Mechanics
Advanced studies of statistical mechanics. Probability theory, random walks, statistical ensembles, entropy, quantum statistical mechanics and applications.
Pre-requistites: Bachelor's degree in physics or permission of instructor.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 7130 Solid State Physics
Solid State Physics
Advanced studies of solid state physics. Properties of the solid state, semiconductors, novel systems, applications.
Pre-requistites: Bachelor's degree in physics or permission of instructor.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 7160 Atomic and Molecular Physics
Atomic and Molecular Physics
Advanced studies of atomic and molecular physics. The hydrogen, helium and many electron atoms. Diatomic and polyatomic molecules.
Pre-requistites: degree in physics or permission of instructor.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 7170 Quantum Mechanics I
Quantum Mechanics I
Advanced studies of quantum mechanics. Quantization, probability, quantum wave functions, quantum entanglement. Two, three and multi-level quantum systems and applications.
Pre-requistites: Bachelor's degree in physics or permission of instructor.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 7180 Quantum Mechanics II
Quantum Mechanics II
Continuation of PHYS 7170.
Pre-requistites: PHYS 7170.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 7230 Electromagnetic Theory I
Electromagnetic Theory I
Advanced studies of electromagnetic theory. Maxwell's equations and applications. Electric and magnetic fields and their properties. Applications.
Pre-requistites: Bachelor's degree in physics or permission of instructor.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 7240 Electromagnetic Theory II
Electromagnetic Theory II
Continuation of PHYS 7230.
Pre-requistites: PHYS 7230.
credit hours: 3

PHYS 7310 Advanced Special Problems I
Advanced Special Problems I
credit hours: 3

PHYS 7320 Advanced Special Problems II
Advanced Special Problems II
credit hours: 1-9

PHYS 7810 Seminar
Seminar
credit hours: 3

PHYS 7820 Seminar
Seminar
credit hours: 3

PHYS 7910 Research
Research
credit hours: 3

PHYS 7940 Research
Research
credit hours: 3

PHYS 9980 Master's Research
Master's Research
credit hours: 3

PHYS 9990 Dissertation Research
Dissertation Research
credit hours: 3

PHYS H4910 Independent Studies
Independent Studies
Notes: Fulfills the capstone requirement for majors if student co-registers in PHYS 5110.
Pre-requistites: Approval of instructor and chair of department.
credit hours: 3

PHYS H4920 Independent Studies
Independent Studies
Notes: Fulfills the capstone requirement for majors if student co-registers in PHYS 5110.
Pre-requistites: Approval of instructor and chair of department.
credit hours: 3

PHYS H4990 Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
Notes: Open only to candidates for honors degrees with department approval.
credit hours: 3

PHYS H5000 Honors Thesis
Honors Thesis
Notes: Open only to candidates for honors degrees with department approval.
credit hours: 3