Biomedical Engineering courses

BMEN 2020 Computating Concepts and Applications
Computating Concepts and Applications
This course introduces students to the foundations of algorithm development and programming, basics of matrix algebra and numerical analysis, solving ordinary differential equations.
credit hours: 4

BMEN 2310 Product and Experimental Design
Product and Experimental Design
The objective of this course is to introduce students to the design process as they are starting the BMEN Curriculum. Through team projects geared toward translating bench research into product development, students will be challenged to begin thinking critically and applying physical fundamentals to complex systems. Weekly lectures will highlight phases of the design process, including problem identification, conceptual design, and early prototyping. Additionally, in the context of product and experimental design, students will gain experience with computer aided design and be provided an introduction to statistics. Course restricted to BMEN majors, or by permission of the instructors.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 2600 Introduction to Organic and Bio-Chemistries
Introduction to Organic and Bio-Chemistries
This course introduces the main principles of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, preparing the student for BMEN 3030/3040. Topics include nomenclature of organic compounds and bio-molecules, major reactions of organic chemistry, relationship between chemical structures and biological functions, and the reaction pathways of major metabolic processes. Students will be introduced to the three-dimensional structure of organic compounds and biomolecules using molecular models and software tools.
Pre-requistites: CHEM 1080 and CHEM 1085, or approval of instructor.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 2730 Biomedical Electronics with Lab
Biomedical Electronics with Lab
Rectifiers, filters, regulators and power supplies. Analog amplifiers and active filters of interest for medical devices. Combinational and sequential digital logic design techniques and circuits. Brief overview of modulation, encoding, and interfacing. Electrical safety. Extensive weekly lab projects.
Pre-requistites: ENGP 2010.
credit hours: 4

BMEN 3010 The Physical Dimensions of Aging
The Physical Dimensions of Aging
This course is designed to introduce students to the physiological, behavioral, and socio-economic changes associated with aging. In particular, we will focus on what physiological and structural changes are typical for an aging human body focusing on the brain, cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems. We will also discuss what it means to become older within a community, what can a person expect during the aging process, and what kind of control a person has over his/her aging body. Course participants travel to local aging centers and continuing care facilities as part of the learning process.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 3030 Anatomy and Physiology for Engineers
Anatomy and Physiology for Engineers
This course is a single semester course in human structural anatomy. Course participants will examine both typical and pathological examples for the various subsystems including body tissues; the musculoskeletal; neurological; cardiovascular; respiratory; digestive; and reproductive systems.
Pre-requistites: ENGP 2430 and CELL 1010 or EBIO 1010. 
Co-requisites: BMEN 3035. 
credit hours: 3

BMEN 3035 Anatomy and Physiology Lab for Engineers
Anatomy and Physiology Lab for Engineers
This single-semester laboratory coordinates hands on learning in human structural anatomy.  Course participants will dissect and examine both typical and pathological examples for the various subsystems including body tissues; the musculoskeletal; neurological; cardiovascular; respiratory; digestive; and reproductive systems.
Co-requisites: BMEN 3030. 
credit hours: 1

BMEN 3070 Quantitative Physiology
Quantitative Physiology
This course places emphasis upon the chemical basis of life; cells and cellular metabolism; histology and tissues; the endocrine, skeletal and nervous systems; respiratory, digestive, cardiovascular, lymphatic and reproductive systems; nutrition and metabolism; water, electrolyte and acid-base balance, and human growth and development.
Pre-requistites: CHEM 1070, CHEM 1080, CELL 1010, BMEN 2600 (or equivalent)
Co-requisites: BMEN 3075.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 3075 Quantitative Physiology Lab
Quantitative Physiology Lab
Subject matter will include blood, nutrition, and metabolism; and the cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems.
Co-requisites: BMEN 3070.
credit hours: 1

BMEN 3300 Biomechanics
Biomechanics
This course introduces students to the various interdisciplinary fields in biomechanics. Specific topics include: kinematics during human activity; the analysis of forces and stresses/strains in biological structures under loading; models for biological materials; the relationship between structure and function in orthopedic tissues and continuum mechanics. Fulfills departmental “"domain"” requirement.  An additional non-graded once a week lab section to accompany lectures. 
Pre-requistites: BMEN 3030
credit hours: 3

BMEN 3400 Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering
Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering
This course will focus on fundamental materials science and biological principles that impact the engineering design of biomaterials and tissue-engineered products. Topics addressed will include structural hierarchies of materials and tissues, physical and chemical properties of surfaces, degradation of materials, and cell-surface, cell-cell, and cell-matrix interactions. The course will conclude with inflammatory, immunological, and pathological events associated with responses to such products. Laboratory exercises will be utilized to illustrate selected concepts, introduce assessment methods, and provide hands-on experiences with cells and materials. Fulfills departmental “domain” requirement.  An additional non-graded once a week lab section to accompany lectures. 
Pre-requistites: ENGP 3120 and BMEN 2600, or permission of instructor.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 3420 Transport in Cells and Organs
Transport in Cells and Organs
Fundamental principles of Fluid mechanics and mass transport will be applied to biological systems at the cellular, tissue, and organ levels. The topics of this course will be the cardiovascular, respiratory systems and cell adhesion, drug transport and pharmacokinetics, and transport-related pathophysiological conditions (inflammation, atherosclerosis, thrombosis, sickle cell disease, cancer metastasis). The lab session will provide training in measurement and analysis of cell transport in parallel-plate flow systems. Fulfills departmental "“domain"” requirement.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 3440 Biofluid Mechanics
Biofluid Mechanics
This class focuses on fundamental concepts and properties of fluid mechanics with applications to the body. Topics to be covered include basic equations of fluid statics, dynamics and mass transport in differential and integral form using both system and control volume viewpoints. Rheological properties of biological fluids are studied as well as dimensional analysis and similitude. Advanced applications are investigated using the finite element method.
Pre-requistites: ENGP 1410, ENGP 2430, MATH 2240.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 3650 Biomechanics and Biotransport
Biomechanics and Biotransport
This course introduces students to biomechanics and biotransport. Specific topics include: the analysis of forces and stresses/strains in biological structures under loading; constitutive models for biological materials; the relationship between structure and function in tissues and organs. These topics will be related to fundamental principles of fluid mechanics and mass transport of biological systems at the cellular, tissue, and organ levels including cell adhesion and migration; intracellular, transmembrane and transvascular transport; drug transport and pharmacokinetics. Fulfills departmental 'domain" requirement.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 3710 BMEN Seminar
BMEN Seminar
Each week, a one-hour seminar on current research is presented.
credit hours: 0

BMEN 3730 Biomedical Signals and Systems
Biomedical Signals and Systems
Fundamentals of biomedical Signals and analysis and introduction to control systems. Topics include Laplace and Fourier transforms, the convolution theorem, time- and space-frequency-domain analysis, signals and noise, the mathematics of imaging, and examples and applications to biomedical signals. The use of MATLAS and Simulink to analyze biomedical systems will be reinforced.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 3780 Projects in Embedded Control
Projects in Embedded Control
Design and construction of embedded controllers using Atmega and Arduino hardware. Control of servo devices, robotics, display and sensor interfacing, and data storage are considered. Assembly language is introduced. In-lab and final projects. Fulfills departmental “domain” requirement.
Pre-requistites: BMEN 2730.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 3820 Mathematical Modeling and Analysis of Biological Systems
Mathematical Modeling and Analysis of Biological Systems
The objective of this course is to teach basic mathematical modeling constructs and analysis techniques that are used for studying biological processes. Topics to be covered include ordinary differential equations, compartment systems, basics of dynamic systems, stability, statistical inference and model construction. These will be applied to study models of chemical kinetics, physiological control, AIDS transmission, population dynamics, and growth. Students will use Mathematica to develop and analyze models.
Pre-requistites: MATH 2240, CELL 1010.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 3910 TRIZ-Theory of Inventive Design
TRIZ-Theory of Inventive Design
The objective of this course is to introduce students to TRIZ (Russian acronym for "Theory of Inventive Problem Solving") a design method initially developed in the Soviet Union and used today by many Fortune 500 companies. TRIZ is an algorithmic approach to solving technical problems. In this course, students will learn and apply TRIZ principles to the design of technical systems in their area of interest-including but not limited to medical implant design, scientific research, and assistive device technology, 3910 fulfills departmental "domain" requirement: 6930 additionally requires patent search and application of TRIZ to "design around a patent".
credit hours: 3

BMEN 3932 Elements of Biomedical Engineering Design
Elements of Biomedical Engineering Design
This course develops the fundamental aspects of the mechanical performance of devices and components. Topics include a review of stress analysis, failure criteria, fatigue analysis and stress concentrations, as well as the mechanical behavior of fasteners, welded joints, spring selection, bearing design, and introduction to finite element analysis; with applications to biomedical engineering.
Pre-requistites: Mechanics of Materials.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 4030 Team Design Projects I
Team Design Projects I
Techniques and experience in the solution of constrained and open-ended design problems. Lecture topics include all aspects of the design process, including goal setting, idea generation, prototyping, fabrication, and product and evaluation. Also included are technical presentation, project planning and management. Included as needed are other topics such as standards, fastening and joining, motors and control, esthetics and finish. Each team will design and construct a device or system to assist an individual with a disability. These designs are presented in a public show during the second semester.
Pre-requistites: at least one BMEN3xxxdomain course
credit hours: 2

BMEN 4040 Team Design Projects II
Team Design Projects II
Techniques and experience in the solution of constrained and open-ended design problems. Lecture topics include all aspects of the design process, including goal setting, idea generation, prototyping, fabrication, and product and evaluation. Also included are technical presentation, project planning and management. Included as needed are other topics such as standards, fastening and joining, motors and control, esthetics and finish. Each team will design and construct a device or system to assist an individual with a disability. These designs are presented in a public show during the second semester.
Pre-requistites: BMEN 4030
credit hours: 3

BMEN 4090 Special Problems in Biomedical Engineering
Special Problems in Biomedical Engineering
Independent study and investigation of special problems in biomedical engineering. Details can be arranged with individual biomedical engineering faculty members.
credit hours: 1-4

BMEN 4100 Special Problems in Biomedical Engineering
Special Problems in Biomedical Engineering
Independent study and investigation of special problems in biomedical engineering. Details can be arranged with individual biomedical engineering faculty members.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 4890 Service Learning: Beyond Design
Service Learning: Beyond Design
The required BMEN 4030/4040 design sequence is centered on the design and construction of a device or system to assist an individual with a disability or a group servicing such individuals. As an option, students may choose to supplement their interaction with their clients with a service learning component that follows Tulane's guidelines for service learning courses and specifically requires: Completing at least 40 hours in a community setting during the semester; keeping a journal of weekly activities that will allow the student to describe and evaluate his/her experiences with the activity; and creating a product that can be evaluated as part of the course grade (e.g., a review paper on an issue relevant to the service activity, or some product of value to the site).
Pre-requistites: Approval of instructor.
Co-requisites: BMEN 4030 or 4040.
credit hours: 1

BMEN 4900 RPP: Art of Professional Engineering
RPP: Art of Professional Engineering
Research and Professional Practice (RPP) is a 2-semester sequence beginning in Spring of the Junior year. It satisfies the University's "Writing Intensive" requirement. A lecture series in the Spring semester, called "Art of Professional Engineering" includes economic analysis, ethics, professional communication including writing and oral presentation, research techniques including literature searching, citation, and the structure of a scientific paper. Students must also register for either 4901 or 4902 in the Spring semester, and continue the sequence with 4911 or 4912/4930 in the following Fall semester.
credit hours: 1

BMEN 4901 RPP: Grand Challenges I
RPP: Grand Challenges I
The 2-semester sequence presents a group of upper division undergraduates with a very difficult problem in biomedical engineering that will require creative invention, innovation, laboratory hard skills, and unique design methodologies to address. Though the problem is tractable, is not expected that the GC problem will be completely solved. Rather, the intent is that the GC group of students will push forward a developed "good solution" to the point where the need to protect intellectual property arises, and where market value and potential venture investments is apparent.
Pre-requistites: Instructor Approval
credit hours: 2

BMEN 4902 RPP: Senior Research and Professional Experience I
RPP: Senior Research and Professional Experience I
This two-course sequence is designed to facilitate an individual biomedical research or design experience in a laboratory. Students will be intorduced to the tools, techniques, and rules necessary to function independently and professionally as a researcher or engineer. Topics include thesis writing, technical communication, and time management. The main component of the course is a two semester long research or design project under the direction of a faculty member, scientist or other professional. The course sequence culminates in a formal Senior Thesis and Research Conference presentation. Students participating in the 5th year BSE-MS program should not register for BMEN 4912 in the Fall of the Senior year, registering instead for BMEN 4930.
credit hours: 2

BMEN 4911 RPP: Grand Challenges II
RPP: Grand Challenges II
The 2-semester sequence presents a group of upper division undergraduates with a very difficult problem in biomedical engineering that will require creative invention, innovation, laboratory hard skills, and unique design methodologies to address. Though the problem is tractable, is not expected that the GC problem will be completely solved. Rather, the intent is that the GC group of students will push forward a developed "good solution" to the point where the need to protect intellectual property arises, and where market value and potential venture investments is apparent.
Pre-requistites: Instructor Approval
credit hours: 2

BMEN 4912 RPP: Senior Research and Professional Experience II
RPP: Senior Research and Professional Experience II
This two-course sequence is designed to facilitate an individual biomedical research or design experience in a laboratory. Students will be intorduced to the tools, techniques, and rules necessary to function independently and professionally as a researcher or engineer. Topics include thesis writing, technical communication, and time management. The main component of the course is a two semester long research or design project under the direction of a faculty member, scientist or other professional. The course sequence culminates in a formal Senior Thesis and Research Conference presentation. Students participating in the 5th year BSE-MS program should not register for BMEN 4912 in the Fall of the Senior year, registering instead for BMEN 4930.
credit hours: 2

BMEN 4930 BSE-MS Thesis
BSE-MS Thesis
In order to meet undergraduate degree requirements, this course will allow fifth year students to more effectively concentrate on their research projects in lieu of completing the course requirements of BMEN 4912. The grade for BMEN 4930 will be listed as In Progress (IP) until such time as the master's thesis is completed, whereupon the student's advisor and thesis committee will assign a grade necessary to fulfill bachelor's degree requirements.
Pre-requistites: Approval of instructor; admission to 5th year BSE-MS program.
credit hours: 2

BMEN 6010 The Physical Dimensions of Aging
The Physical Dimensions of Aging
This course is designed to introduce students to the physiological, behavioral, and socio-economic changes associated with aging. In particular, we will focus on the effects of exercise on the aging human system. We will also discuss what it means to become older within a community, what can a person expect during the aging process, and what kind of control a person has over his/her aging body.
Pre-requistites: Instructor approval. Open only to graduate students.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6030 Anatomy and Physiology for Engineers
Anatomy and Physiology for Engineers
This is a single-semester course in human structural anatomy. Course participants will examine both typical and pathological examples for the various subsystems including, body tissues; the musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and reproductive systems.
Pre-requistites: Either CELL 1010 or EBIO 1010. 
Co-requisites: BMEN 3130 or BMEN 3035. Open only to graduate students.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6035 Anatomy and Physiology for Engineers Lab
Anatomy and Physiology for Engineers Lab
This single-semester laboratory coordinates hands-on learning in human structural anatomy. Course participants will dissect and examine both typical and pathological examples for the various subsystems including, body tissues; the musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and reproductive systems. 
Co-requisites: BMEN 6030. Open only to graduate students.
credit hours: 1

BMEN 6070 Quantitative Physiology
Quantitative Physiology
Tulane University Health Sciences Center Staff. This course places emphasis upon the chemical basis of life; cells and cellular metabolism; histology and tissues; the endocrine, skeletal and nervous systems; respiratory, digestive, cardiovascular, lymphatic and reproductive systems; nutrition and metabolism; water, electrolyte and acid-base balance, and human growth and development.
Co-requisites: BMEN 6075. Open only to graduate students.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6075 Quantitative Physiology Lab
Quantitative Physiology Lab
Subject matter will include blood, nutrition, and metabolism; and the cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems.
Co-requisites: BMEN 6070. Open only to graduate students.
credit hours: 1

BMEN 6080 Technology Invention and Commercialization
Technology Invention and Commercialization
"Technology Invention & Commercialization" models innovation and entrepreneurial theory & practices from across a range of commercial size-scales—from small startup companies to intrapreneurial units within large, established companies. The twin poles of theory & practice are balanced through classroom lectures & experiential training. Weekly lectures furnish students with effective & portable theoretical frameworks for identifying, selecting and executing opportunities for technological innovations in healthcare, energy, water and the environment. In the experiential training, students will apply their classroom learning to targeted, formal innovation & entrepreneurship competitions—including regional & national design contests, technology challenges, and business model competitions. Completion of this course will supply students with intellectual groundwork & practical experience in advancing inventive technological ideas towards commercialization and ultimately public benefit.

credit hours: 3

BMEN 6170 Biomedical Optics
Biomedical Optics
The field of biophotonics is a rapidly-expanding re-search area in which the interactions of photons with matter are leveraged to increase our understanding of biology and to improve the outcomes in human medicine. The objectives of this course are to familiarize students with the fundamental interactions between light and biological samples, and how these are implemented in an array of technologies that are finding successful application in biomedical research and clinical application. Topics will include fundamentals of photon transport in turbid media; optical spectroscopy variants (reflectance, fluorescence, Raman; steady-state and time-resolved); diffuse optical imaging; biological microscopy; coherence techniques; hybrid technologies (e.g. photo-acoustic imaging); and optical molecular imaging. Special attention will be paid to quantitative methods for spectroscopy and imaging in solid tissues. The class will be composed of lectures, and interactive discussions on recent papers representing the state of the art in the field.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6260 Molecular Principles of Functional Biomaterials
Molecular Principles of Functional Biomaterials
Functional biomaterials are non-viable materials that have been designed or modified in order to elicit specific biological responses when interacting with human fluids, cells, tissues, or organs. This course will focus on chemical principles utilized in endowing polymeric materials with biological functionality for medical applications. Following a brief review of polymer properties with a focus on hydrogels, topics addressed will include attachment of proteins to materials, induction of cell-binding and differentiation, responsive polymers, and spatial and temporal control of material properties for biological signaling. Unifying concepts will be introduced by directed reading and discussion of landmark papers in the biomaterials literature. Supplemental laboratory exercises will be utilized to illustrate selected concepts and introduce experimental procedures.
Pre-requistites: BMEN 3230/6230.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6300 Biomechanics
Biomechanics
This course introduces students to the various interdisciplinary fields in biomechanics. Specific topics include: kinematics during human activity; the analysis of forces and stresses/strains in biological structures under loading; viscoelasticity models for biological materials; and the relationship between structure and function in orthopedic tissues; and continuum mechanics Fulfills departmental “"domain”" requirement.  An additional non-graded once a week lab section to accompany lectures.
Pre-requistites: Open only to graduate students.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6310 Continuum Models in Biomedical Engineering
Continuum Models in Biomedical Engineering
The course begins with a presentation of the kinematics of continuous media and elementary tensor manipulations. We will then cover the conservation principles of mass, linear momentum, angular momentum, and energy. Additional topics will include the formulation of constitutive laws, continuum models in electrodynamics, and simple descriptions of piezoelectric materials. These concepts will be applied to fundamental problems in bio-solid mechanics, bio-fluid mechanics, and bio-electromagnetism.
Pre-requistites: ENGP 2430, BMEN 3300, BMEN 3440.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6330 Advanced Biofluid Mechanics
Advanced Biofluid Mechanics
This course will cover general intermediate/advanced fluid mechanics, and will provide a foundation from which to base one's studies of biofluid mechanics. Issues pertinent to the study of biofluid mechanics will be emphasized. Topics to be studied include kinematic principles, the Navier-Stokes equations, boundary conditions for viscous flows, basic solutions to steady and unsteady Navier-Stokes equations, turbulence, analysis of the vorticity equation, and interfacial phenomena. Whenever possible, problems of a biological nature will be used as examples.
Pre-requistites: ENGP 2430, BMEN 3440.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6340 Soft Tissue Mechanics
Soft Tissue Mechanics
This course provides an introduction to the various approaches used in modeling soft tissues, with particular attention paid to those of the musculoskeletal system (e.g. ligament, tendon, cartilage). Particular emphasis will be placed on the theoretical and experimental consequences of the large deformation behavior of these tissues. An important objective of this class is to enable the student to develop a sense for the physical and mathematical relationships between the many types of models (and the associated experiments) currently being utilized in soft tissue mechanics.
Pre-requistites: ENGP 2430, BMEN 3300.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6360 Introduction to Finite Element Analyis
Introduction to Finite Element Analyis
Matrix structural analysis techniques as applied to frames, problems in plane strain, plane stress, and axisymmetric and 3-D structures. Development of the isoparametric family of finite elements. Use of user written and packaged software.
Pre-requistites: BMEN 3300 or equivalent.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6400 Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering
Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering
This course will focus on fundamental materials science and biological principles that impact the engineering design of biomaterials and tissue-engineered products. Topics addressed will include structural hierarchies of materials and tissues, physical and chemical properties of surfaces, degradation of materials, and cell-surface, cell-cell, and cell-matrix interactions. The course will conclude with inflammatory, immunological, and pathological events associated with responses to such products. Laboratory exercises will be utilized to illustrate selected concepts, introduce assessment methods, and provide hands-on experiences with cells and materials. An additional non-graded once a week lab section to accompany lectures. 
Pre-requistites: ENGP 3120 and BMEN 2600, or permission of instructor. Open only to graduate students.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6420 Transport in Cells and Organs
Transport in Cells and Organs
Open only to graduate students. Fundamental principles of fluid mechanics and mass transport will be applied to biological systems at the cellular, tissue, and organ levels. The topics of this course will be the cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and cell adhesion and migration, intracellular, transmembrane and transvascular transport: drug transport and pharmacokinetics, and transport-related pathophysiological conditions (inflammation, atherosclerosis, thrombosis, sickle cell disease, cancer metastasis). The lab sessions will provide training in measurement and analysis of cell transport in parallel-plate flow systems.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6430 Vascular Bioengineering
Vascular Bioengineering
The objectives of this graduate-level course are to familiarize students with contemporary research areas that cover the field of vascular biology, and to provide an understanding of bioengineering principles related to physiological function and therapeutic modalities. Example topics include smooth muscle cell and endothelial cell lineage, leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions, angiogenesis, drug targeting via the microcirculation, neural vascular control, atherosclerosis, and hypertension. These topics will be presented in the context of four over-arching sections: 1) Vascular Cell Biology; 2) Principles of Vascular Function and Design; 3) Vascular Pathophysiology, and 4) Therapeutic Design. For each section of the course students will be required to read, critically analyze, and present relevant articles. As indicated by the section titles, the course will culminate by highlighting how our basic understanding of physiological function/dysfunction can be translated to therapeutic design.
Pre-requistites: BMEN 3070, BMEN 3400/6400.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6460 Cellular Mechanotransduction
Cellular Mechanotransduction
This course reviews cellular mechanotransduction in a variety of tissues that adapt to physiological loading. A partial list of mechanosensing cells sells in these tissues include hair cells in inner ears, chondracytes in cartilage, osteocytes in bone, endothelial cells in blood vessels, etc. In particular, this course emphasizes the role of mathematical modeling in solving biological problems. Hands-on mathematical modeling will be assigned as homework and projects.
Pre-requistites: ENGP 2430, BMEN 3030, BMEN 3440/6440 or instructor's approval.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6600 Computational Modeling of Biomedical Systems
Computational Modeling of Biomedical Systems
The objective of this graduate course is to provide students with the skills and knowledge necessary for computational modeling of biological and physiological systems. The first half of the course will cover introduction to UNIX, elements of programming (Matlab and FORTRAN), and numerical methods commonly used in biomedical research. The second half will immerse the students in specific biomedical applications including hemodynamics, respiratory flow, cellular mechanobiology, and neural dynamics. Most lectures will be accompanied by computer labs.
credit hours: 4

BMEN 6610 Introduction to Computational Biomechanics
Introduction to Computational Biomechanics
This course covers fundamentals of computational methods with the emphasis in biomechanics applications. The computational methods include finite element methods and finite difference methods at the introductory level. The course will use MATLAB to implement these methods. The underlying theories of these numerical methods will be taught, and example problems will be discussed during the lecture. Example problems will include those from implant design, bone biomechanics, soft tissue biomechanics, etc. in static and dynamic conditions. The course will also discuss some special issues such as the stability/convergence criteria and the error estimation. The student will work on a term project to exercise these issues on a biomechanics problem of his/her choice.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6620 Multiscale Modeling of Biophysical Systems
Multiscale Modeling of Biophysical Systems
This course is an introduction to multi-scale modeling from the atomistic- to continuum-levels. This course will begin with an introduction to molecular modeling with an emphasis on biomolecules and applications related to membranes, proteins and DNA. Continuum mechanics models of DNA and membranes will be developed, including equations of state describing the large-scale influence of atomistic structures in fluid systems. Students will learn to perform continuum mechanics calculations that will link to these atomistic structures, and thus model dynamic systems that span many scales.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6630 Cell Mechanics
Cell Mechanics
Fundamental principles of continuum mechanics will be applied to problems of biomechanics at the cellular level. Topics covered include structure of mammalian cells, cell membrane mechanics, mechanics of the cytoskeleton, models of cell viscoelasticity, cell adhesion, active cell processes, flow-induced deformation of blood cells, and experimental techniques (micropipette aspiration, biointerface probe, atomic force microscopy, magnetic twisting cytometry, optical tweezers, and flow chamber assays).
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6670 Pulmonary Mechanics
Pulmonary Mechanics
This is a survey course in which mechanical models of the pulmonary system are discussed. Topics to be addressed include mucous transport, airflow/diffusion in the pulmonary airways, ventilation/perfusion relationships, flow through collapsible airways and interfacial phenomena.
Pre-requistites: MATH 2240, BMEN 6330 or equivalent.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6680 Orthopaedic Bioengineering
Orthopaedic Bioengineering
Concentration on various engineering aspects of the human knee and the treatment of its common orthopaedic pathologies. Topics include histophysiology of wound healing, synovial joint anatomy and tissue biomechanics, knee biomechanics, osteochondral and ligamentous graft reconstruction, prosthetic ligaments, and knee arthroplasty with emphasis on the design issues involved and the integration of clinical practice.
Pre-requistites: ENGP 1410, ENGP 2430, ENGP 3120.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6710 Departmental Seminar
Departmental Seminar
Each week, a one-hour seminar on research within or outside the department is presented. During the Spring semester, all seniors are required to give a presentation on their project or internship. Attendance of all seniors and graduate students is required in the Fall semester.  
credit hours: 0

BMEN 6720 Research Day Conference
Research Day Conference
Each week, a one-hour seminar on research within or outside the department is presented. During the Spring semester, all seniors are required to give a presentation on their project or internship.
Notes: Attendance of all graduate students is required in the Fall semester.
credit hours: 0

BMEN 6740 Data Acquisition and Control
Data Acquisition and Control
Acquisition, digital processing, and output of signals of biomedical interest. Closed loop control applications for medical devices. Programming in the National Instruments LabVIEW environment. In-lab and final projects.
Pre-requistites: BMEN 2730.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6780 Projects in Embedded Control
Projects in Embedded Control
Design and construction of embedded controllers using Atmega and Arduino hardware. Control of servo devices, robotics, display and sensor interfacing, and data storage are considered. Assembly language is emphasized. In-lab and final projects.
Pre-requistites: BMEN 2730. Open only to graduate students.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6790 Biomedical Engineering Design Studio
Biomedical Engineering Design Studio
This course is intended to provide students with a realistic design experience from virtual design, to rapid prototype fabrication, to testing, through redesign. It will focus on the practical application of leading commercial design software, including the creative extension of this software to innovate research applications. The course will be project intensive with commensurate report submissions and future design recommendations. Projects will include analyses of existing clinical problems, as well as research development of cell scaffolds and cell mechanotransduction.
Pre-requistites: BMEN Graduate or BMEN Senior Undergraduate standing. 
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6820 Fundamentals of Mathematical Modeling and Analysis of Biological Systems
Fundamentals of Mathematical Modeling and Analysis of Biological Systems
The objective of this course is to teach basic mathematical modeling constructs and analysis techniques that are used for studying biological processes. Topics to be covered include ordinary differential equations, compartment systems, basics of dynamic systems, stability, statistical inference and model construction. These will be applied to study models of chemical kinetics, physiological control, AIDS transmission, population dynamics, and growth. Students will use Mathematica to develop and analyze models.
Pre-requistites: MATH 2240. Open only to graduate students.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6830 Intro to Biomedical Imaging and Image Processing
Intro to Biomedical Imaging and Image Processing
The objective of this course is to teach graduate students the concepts, algorithms and programming of image analysis techniques and apply them to address real world biomedical imaging challenges. The physics of medical imaging modalities including x-ray, MRI, CT, PET and microscopic imaging will be introduced. The basic underlying mathematical signal processing techniques such as Fourier analysis and linear system theory will be studied to model and process biomedical images. Finally, students will learn how to use MATLAB as a tool and apply the image processing techniques to solve some medical imaging problems such as image enhancement, segmentation and pattern classification.
Pre-requistites: Experience with MATLAB. 
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6840 Medical Imaging Physics
Medical Imaging Physics
This course will introduce imaging methods in medicine, including radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine (PET and SPECT), and ultrasound imaging. The basic physical principles of each imaging modality will be introduced, including the imaging energy source, properties and interaction with tissue. Basic concepts of image reconstruction will be discussed. This course will include laboratory visits to the School of Medicine Department of Radiology to explore real world uses of medical imaging systems. A course project will be assigned for students to assess new and emerging medical imaging systems.
Pre-requistites: BMEN3730/BMEN6730 Biomedical Signals and Systems or equivalent
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6860 Seminar in Biofluid Mechanics
Seminar in Biofluid Mechanics
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6930 TRIZ-Theory of Inventive Design
TRIZ-Theory of Inventive Design
The objective of this course is to introduce students to TRIZ (Russian acronym for "Theory of Inventive Problem Solving") a design method initially developed in the Soviet Union and used today by many Fortune 500 companies. TRIZ is an algorithmic approach to solving technical problems. In this course, students will learn and apply TRIZ principles to the design of technical systems in their area of interest-including but not limited to medical implant design, scientific research, and assistive device technology. Patent search and application of TRIZ to design around a patent also required.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 6932 Elements of Biomedical Engineering Design
Elements of Biomedical Engineering Design
This course develops the fundamental aspects of the mechanical performance of devices and components. Topics include a review of stress analysis, failure criteria, fatigue analysis and stress concentrations, as well as the mechanical behavior of fasteners, welded joints, spring selection, bearing design, and introduction to finite element analysis; with applications to biomedical engineering. ·  
Pre-requistites: Mechanics of Materials. Open only to graduate students.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 7100 Current Topics in Biomedical Engineering
Current Topics in Biomedical Engineering
This course focuses on state-of-the art technologies and scientific discoveries in biomedical engineering. Experimental design/analysis topics will include proper controls, statistics, data presentation, and data interpretation. These types of technologies to be included are in the areas of epigenetics and genetics, molecular and cellular biology, proteins, mechanics and materials science, modeling and simulation, high-throughput omics, and/or imaging. Seminal articles from top-tier journals in the field of biomedical engineering will also be selected and discussed in class. The chosen articles will span a wide range of topic areas including articles that focus on basic science as well as fundamental engineering. Student-based discussion is a key component of the teaching approach utilized.
credit hours: 3

BMEN 7210 Directed Readings in Biomedical Engineering
Directed Readings in Biomedical Engineering
Taught on a tutorial basis, this course allows a student to make an in-depth study in an area of expertise of members of the department. Some recent and current topics include non-Newtonian fluid mechanics; the mechanics of the inner ear; the mechanics of bone; the mechanics of soft tissue; ceramics engineering; physical metallurgy; laser applications in medicine; and modeling of neural networks.
credit hours: 1-6

BMEN 7220 Directed Readings in Biomedical Engineering
Directed Readings in Biomedical Engineering
Taught on a tutorial basis, this course allows a student to make an in-depth study in an area of expertise of members of the department. Some recent and current topics include non-Newtonian fluid mechanics; the mechanics of the inner ear; the mechanics of bone; the mechanics of soft tissue; ceramics engineering; physical metallurgy; laser applications in medicine; and modeling of neural networks.
credit hours: 1-6

BMEN 9980 Master's Research
Master's Research
credit hours: 3

BMEN 9990 Dissertation Research
Dissertation Research
credit hours: 3

SCEN 2010 Clinical Musculoskeletal Anatomy - Upper Extremity
Clinical Musculoskeletal Anatomy - Upper Extremity
This course is designed to provide students with a fundamental working knowledge of normal gross anatomy of the upper limb - the shoulder, arm, forearm, and hand. The structure of this part of the body is taught as a basis for applying the knowledge learned to normal function (physiology). In order to encourage students to understand the relationship between structure and function, examples of tools used in the clinical practice of medicine will be taught. Radiologic imaging (radiographs and ultrasound scans) will be used to aid learning of the structure of the upper limb. Examples of abnormal function and conditions seen in clinical medicine will also be taught. During laboratory, students will work in teams of 5 (small group learning) to perform structured dissection of the limb, and learn basic skills in how to use dissecting tools, and how to suture.
credit hours: 3

SCEN 2020 Clinical Musculoskeletal Anatomy - Lower Extremity
Clinical Musculoskeletal Anatomy - Lower Extremity
This course is designed to provide students with a fundamental working knowledge of normal gross anatomy of the lower limb the hip, thigh, knee, leg, ankle, and foot. The structure of this part of the body is taught as a basis for applying knowledge learned to normal function (physiology). IN order to encourage students to understand the relationship between structure and function, examples of tools used in the clinical practice of medicine will be taught. Radiologic imaging (radiographs and ultrasound scans) will be used to aid learning of the structure of the lower limb. Examples of abnormal function and conditions seen in clinical medicine will also be taught. During laboratory, students will work in small groups to perform dissection of a cadaver, and learn basic skills in how to use dissecting tools and how to suture.

credit hours: 3