Technological Systems courses

ATCS 1010 Technological Systems I
Technological Systems I
Materials and Methods of Construction: Overview of the many systems that must be understood and applied in the design of buildings, including materials, methods of construction, and fundamentals of structure.
credit hours: 3

ATCS 1100 Technological Systems I
Technological Systems I
Materials and Methods of Construction: Overview of the many systems that must be understood and applied in the design of buildings, including materials, methods of construction, and fundamentals of structure.
credit hours: 3

ATCS 3100 Technological Systems II
Technological Systems II
Structural Systems: Concrete, wood, steel, and composite materials studied as framing systems. Compression and tension structures, dead and live loads, lateral and seismic loads; design and analysis of trusses, beams, columns, walls, and connections; shear wall and diaphragm systems; long and short span systems.
credit hours: 3

ATCS 3200 Technological Systems III
Technological Systems III
Environmental Systems: Climate responsive design, including. building envelope design, passive and mechanical cooling/heating, lighting, plumbing, acoustics, and life safety.
credit hours: 3

ATCS 3300 Material Paradoxes: Concrete and Glass
Material Paradoxes: Concrete and Glass
The seminar will involve hands on experiments with two widely used and paradoxical construction materials: concrete and glass. Students will be introduced to the basic chemical compositions and characteristics of these two materials and will study specific applications in contemporary architecture which demonstrate or allude to the paradoxical nature of these materials.
credit hours: 3

ATCS 3310 Materials and Techniques
Materials and Techniques
Through the course of several projects students will be introduced to the methods, tools and techniques of working with wood, metal, plaster, and plastics. This is a "hands-on" class with the intention of giving the student a basic understanding of the logic of making things from a practical perspective.
credit hours: 3

ATCS 4100 Integrated Technologies I:
Integrated Technologies I:
Advanced integrated topics in materials and methods of construction, structural systems, and environmental systems, taught through case study and analysis.
credit hours: 3

ATCS 4200 Integrated Technologies II:
Integrated Technologies II:
Comprehensive integration of building systems into building design.
Co-requisites: Integrated with DSGN 3200.
credit hours: 3

ATCS 4320 URBANbuild: Management and Professional Practice
URBANbuild: Management and Professional Practice
As an integral component of the URBANbuild program, students design and construct a prototypical house for neighborhoods in partnership with community non-profit agencies that specialize in affordable housing and neighborhood redevelopment. With the leadership of highly qualified architectural design faculty, and under the supervision of a general contractor, students complete the full-scale management and construction of one single-family or multi-family home in an under served New Orleans neighborhood. In the construction phase, students gain first hand knowledge of the construction process including project management, field crew management, construction planning and strategizing, safety issues, fundraising, schedule coordination, archives/public relations, website development, materials research, budget, purchasing and inventory, engineering, working drawings coordination, and detail and specifications coordination. Students will be responsible for foundation, framing and all general construction tasks excluding special technical trades such as electrical, plumbing, and mechanical systems which will be handled by licensed subcontractors.
Co-requisites: ATCS 6320 and APFC 4320.
credit hours: 3

ATCS 6300 Innovations In Building Materials and Methods
Innovations In Building Materials and Methods
A research seminar focusing on new materials and technologies being employed in current architectural practices locally, nationally, and globally. The seminar will be directed to gain insight and give exposure to little know or under utilized innovations through specific materials research and data gathering, case study applications research, and hands-on speculative testing/demonstration. Research will explore building components and tectonics, the material and spatial implications of computer technologies, prefabrication and mass production, as well as smart systems and green building. The course will be both practical and experimental in nature.
credit hours: 3

ATCS 6320 URBANbuild: Materials Research, Fabrication and Construction
URBANbuild: Materials Research, Fabrication and Construction
credit hours: 3-6

ATCS 6400 Sustainability and Tectonics
Sustainability and Tectonics
The course offers an opportunity to explore two major areas of building technology in greater depth. The first of these is sustainable design. While the concept of sustainable design is widely lauded, fundamental principles and techniques of implementation are less clearly understood. Sustainability will first be investigated regarding issues at the scale of the site, linking place and building. Subsequently sustainability at the scale of building systems and materials will be a major focus. The second focus of the course is tectonics, consideration of the physical conditions of architecture, including the logical application of materials and systems. These issues will be considered first in the relation between structure, envelope and finish conditions, particularly at the building perimeter. Subsequently, the interweaving of systems within the building and their expression will be the topic.
Notes: This course is an extension of the material from the required technology sequence, and the completion of that sequence is a prerequisite for admission to this course.
credit hours: 3

ATCS 6410 Implementing an Ecocentric Architecture
Implementing an Ecocentric Architecture
The seminar would pose the question, is it possible to make a non-anthropocentric architecture? This seminar attempts to define and develop a model of an ecocentric architecture, redefining the way we currently build against the backdrop of environmental issues and larger ecological imperatives. New Orleans and its environs will act as a laboratory to explore these ideas.
credit hours: 3