ROTC courses

AERO 1010 The Foundations of the United States Air Force I
The Foundations of the United States Air Force I
Description. AERO 1010 is a survey course designed to introduce students to the United States Air Force and encourage participation in Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Featured topics include: overview of ROTC, special programs offered through ROTC, mission and organization of the Air Force, brief history of the Air Force, introduction to leadership and leadership related issues, Air Force Core Values, Air Force officer opportunities, and an introduction to communication studies. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences. Course Objectives: The AERO 1010 student should know what AFROTC and the Air Force have to offer potential entrants, as well as the expectations the Air Force will set concerning core values and leadership. The student should also have a basic knowledge of what role the Air Force plays and how it is organized to support national objectives. The individual should demonstrate basic communicative skills.
credit hours: 1

AERO 1020 The Foundations of the United States Air Force II
The Foundations of the United States Air Force II
Description. AERO 1020 is a survey course designed to introduce students to the United States Air Force and encourage participation in Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Featured topics include: overview of ROTC, special programs offered through ROTC, mission and organization of the Air Force, brief history of the Air Force, introduction to leadership and leadership related issues, Air Force Core Values, Air Force officer opportunities, and an introduction to communication studies. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences. Course Objectives: The AERO 1020 student should know what AFROTC and the Air Force have to offer potential entrants, as well as the expectations the Air Force will set concerning core values and leadership. The student should also have a basic knowledge of what role the Air Force plays and how it is organized to support national objectives. The individual should demonstrate basic communicative skills.
credit hours: 1

AERO 2010 The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power I
The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power I
Description. A course designed to examine general aspects of air and space power from a historical perspective. The course covers the period from the first balloons and dirigibles to the space-age systems of the Global War on Terror. Historical examples are provided to show the development of Air Force distinctive capabilities (previously referred to as core competencies), and missions (functions) to demonstrate the evolution of what has become today's USAF air and space power. Furthermore, the course examines several fundamental truths associated with war in the third dimension, e.g., principles of war and tenets of air and space power. As a whole, this course provides the students with a knowledge-level understanding for the general employment of air and space power, from an institutional, doctrinal, and historical perspective. In addition, what the students learned about the Air Force Core Values in AERO 1000 will be reinforced through the use of operational examples, and they will complete several writing and briefing assignments to meet Air Force communication skills requirements. Course Objectives: The AERO 2000 student should know the key terms and definitions used to describe air and space power. The individual should know the events, leaders, and technical developments that led to the evolution and employment of USAF air and space power. The individual should demonstrate basic verbal and written communication skills. The individual should know the Air Force Core Values and examples of their use throughout the evolution of USAF air and space power.
credit hours: 1

AERO 2020 The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power II
The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power II
Description. A course designed to examine general aspects of air and space power from a historical perspective. The course covers the period from the first balloons and dirigibles to the space-age systems of the Global War on Terror. Historical examples are provided to show the development of Air Force distinctive capabilities (previously referred to as core competencies), and missions (functions) to demonstrate the evolution of what has become today's USAF air and space power. Furthermore, the course examines several fundamental truths associated with war in the third dimension, e.g., principles of war and tenets of air and space power. As a whole, this course provides the students with a knowledge-level understanding for the general employment of air and space power, from an institutional, doctrinal, and historical perspective. In addition, what the students learned about the Air Force Core Values in AERO 1000 will be reinforced through the use of operational examples, and they will complete several writing and briefing assignments to meet Air Force communication skills requirements. Course Objectives: The AERO 2000 student should know the key terms and definitions used to describe air and space power. The individual should know the events, leaders, and technical developments that led to the evolution and employment of USAF air and space power. The individual should demonstrate basic verbal and written communication skills. The individual should know the Air Force Core Values and examples of their use throughout the evolution of USAF air and space power.
credit hours: 1

AERO 3010 Air Force Leadership Studies I
Air Force Leadership Studies I
Description: AERO 3010 is a study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences in officer-type activities, giving students the opportunity to apply leadership and management principles of this course. Course Objectives: The AERO 3000 cadet should comprehend selected individual leadership skills and personal strengths and weaknesses as applied in an Air Force environment. The individual should comprehend the responsibility and authority of an Air Force officer, the Air Force officer's responsibilities in the counseling and feedback process, and the selected duties and responsibilities as a subordinate leader. The individual should comprehend and apply concepts of ethical behavior as well as comprehend the selected concepts, principles, and theories of quality in Air Force leadership and management. The individual should apply listening, speaking, and writing skills in Air Force-peculiar formats and situations with accuracy, clarity, and appropriate style.
credit hours: 3

AERO 3020 Air Force Leadership Studies II
Air Force Leadership Studies II
Description: AERO 3020 is a study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences in officer-type activities, giving students the opportunity to apply leadership and management principles of this course. Course Objectives: The AERO 3000 cadet should comprehend selected individual leadership skills and personal strengths and weaknesses as applied in an Air Force environment. The individual should comprehend the responsibility and authority of an Air Force officer, the Air Force officer's responsibilities in the counseling and feedback process, and the selected duties and responsibilities as a subordinate leader. The individual should comprehend and apply concepts of ethical behavior as well as comprehend the selected concepts, principles, and theories of quality in Air Force leadership and management. The individual should apply listening, speaking, and writing skills in Air Force-peculiar formats and situations with accuracy, clarity, and appropriate style.
credit hours: 3

AERO 4010 National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty I
National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty I
Description. AERO 4010 examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, officer ship, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Within this structure, continued emphasis is given to refining communication skills. Course Objectives: The AERO 4000 cadet should comprehend the basic elements of national security policy and process. The individual should comprehend the air and space power functions and competencies. Also, the individual should comprehend selected roles of the military in society and current issues affecting the military profession as well as selected provisions of the military justice system. The individual should comprehend the responsibility, authority, and functions of an Air Force commander. The individual should apply listening, speaking, and writing skills in Air Force-peculiar formats and situations with accuracy, clarity, and appropriate style. The individual should comprehend the factors, which facilitate a smooth transition from civilian to military life.
credit hours: 3

AERO 4020 National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty II
National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty II
Description. AERO 4020 examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, officer ship, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Within this structure, continued emphasis is given to refining communication skills. Course Objectives: The AERO 4000 cadet should comprehend the basic elements of national security policy and process. The individual should comprehend the air and space power functions and competencies. Also, the individual should comprehend selected roles of the military in society and current issues affecting the military profession as well as selected provisions of the military justice system. The individual should comprehend the responsibility, authority, and functions of an Air Force commander. The individual should apply listening, speaking, and writing skills in Air Force-peculiar formats and situations with accuracy, clarity, and appropriate style. The individual should comprehend the factors, which facilitate a smooth transition from civilian to military life.
credit hours: 3

MILS 1010 Dynamics of Leadership I
Dynamics of Leadership I
MILS 1010 introduces you to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership and communication. You will learn how the personal development of life skills such as cultural understanding, goal setting, time management, mental/physical resiliency, and stress management relate to leadership, Officership, and the Army profession. As you become further acquainted with MILS 1010, you will learn the structure of the ROTC Basic Course program consisting of MILS 1010, 1020, 2010, 2020, Fall and Spring Leadership Labs, and LTC. The focus is on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of Army leadership dimensions, attributes and core leader competencies while gaining an understanding of the ROTC program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student.
Notes: Offered in the Fall semester.
credit hours: 1

MILS 1020 Dynamics of Leadership II
Dynamics of Leadership II
MILS 1020 overviews leadership fundamentals such as setting direction, problem-solving, listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback, and using effective writing skills. You will explore dimensions of leadership attributes and core leader competencies in the context of practical, hands-on, and interactive exercises. As you become further acquainted with MILS 1020, you will learn the structure of the ROTC Basic Course program consisting of MILS 1010, 1020, 2010, 2020, Fall and Spring Leadership Labs, and LTC. The key objective this semester is to explore (in more detail) the Army’s leadership philosophy and learn fundamental military concepts. Emphasis on Army leadership will provide the learner a better understanding of the ROTC program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student.  
Notes: Offered in the Spring semester.
credit hours: 2

MILS 2010 Management Techniques I
Management Techniques I
MILS 2010 explores the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by examining team dynamics and two historical leadership theories that form the basis of the Army leadership framework. Aspects of personal motivation and team building are practiced planning, executing and assessing team exercises. While participation in the leadership labs is not mandatory during the MILS II year, significant experience can be gained in a multitude of areas and participation in the labs is highly encouraged. The focus continues to build on developing knowledge of the leadership attributes and core leader competencies through the understanding of Army rank, structure, and duties as well as broadening knowledge of land navigation and squad tactics. Case studies will provide a tangible context for learning the Soldier’s Creed and Warrior Ethos.
Notes: Offered in the Fall semester.
credit hours: 1

MILS 2020 Management Techniques II
Management Techniques II
MILS 2020 examines the challenges of leading teams in the complex operational environment. The course highlights dimensions of terrain analysis, patrolling, and operation orders. Further study of the theoretical basis of the Army Leadership Requirements Model explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in the context of military operations. MILS 2020 prepares Cadets for MILS 3010. Cadets develop greater self-awareness as they assess their own leadership styles and practice communication and team building skills. Case studies give insight into the importance and practice of teamwork and tactics in real-world scenarios.
Notes: Offered in the Spring semester.
credit hours: 2

MILS 3010 Advanced Tactics I
Advanced Tactics I
This course is designed to provide opportunities, apply learned skills, and evaluate progress in preparation for successful completion of LDAC. This course is physically and intellectually demanding. Ultimately, each MILS III Cadet is trained in skills such as map reading, land navigation, combat water survival training, basic rifle marksmanship, troop leading procedures, operations order process, briefing skills, problem solving and small-unit tactics/techniques. Active leadership and leadership application techniques is stressed and evaluated during the course.
Notes: Offered in the Fall semester.
credit hours: 2

MILS 3020 Advanced Tactics II
Advanced Tactics II
This is an academically challenging course where you will study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of Army Leadership, Officership, Army Values and ethics, personal development, and small unit tactics at the team and squad level. At the conclusion of this course, you will be capable of planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating and leading a team or squad in the execution of a tactical mission during a classroom PE, a Leadership Lab, or during a Situational Training Exercise (STX) in a field environment. Successful completion of this course will help prepare you for success at the ROTC Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC) which you will attend next summer at Fort Lewis, WA. This course includes reading assignments, homework assignments, small group assignments, briefings, case studies, and practical exercises, a mid-term exam, and a final exam. You will receive systematic and specific feedback on your leader attributes values and core leader competencies from your instructor and other ROTC cadre and MILS IV Cadets who will evaluate you using the ROTC Leader Development Program (LDP) model.
Notes: Offered in the Spring semester.
credit hours: 2

MILS 4010 Professionalism of Leadership I
Professionalism of Leadership I
MILS 4010 transitions the focus of student learning from being trained, mentored and evaluated as an MILS III Cadet to learning how to train, mentor and evaluate underclass Cadets. MILS IV Cadets learn the duties and responsibilities of an Army staff officer and apply the Military Decision Making Process, Army Writing Style, and the Army’s Training Management and METL Development processes during weekly Training Meetings to plan, execute and assess battalion training events. Cadets learn to safely conduct training by understanding and employing the Composite Risk Management Process. Cadets learn how to use the Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) program to reduce and manage stress.
Notes: Offered in the Fall semester.
credit hours: 1

MILS 4020 Professionalism of Leadership II
Professionalism of Leadership II
MILS 4020 explores the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations in the full spectrum operations (FSO).  You will examine differences in customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, and rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism. You also explore aspects of interacting with non-government organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host nation support. The course places significant emphasis on preparing you for BOLC B, and your first unit of assignment. It uses case studies, scenarios, and “What Now, Lieutenant?” exercises to prepare you to face the complex ethical and practical demands of leading as a commissioned officer in the United States Army. This semester, you will: Explore Military Professional Ethics and ethical decision making facing an Officer Gain practical experience in Cadet battalion leadership roles Demonstrate personal skills in operations and communications Evaluate and develop MILS III small unit leaders and examine issues of force protection in FSO Prepare for the transition to a career as an Army Officer  
Notes: Offered in the Spring semester.
credit hours: 1

NAVS 1010 Introduction to Naval Science
Introduction to Naval Science
Freshman/Fall.  A general introduction to the naval profession and to concepts of sea power. The mission, organization, and warfare components of the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. Overview of officer and enlisted ranks and rates, training and education, and career patterns. Naval courtesy and customs, military justice, leadership, and nomenclature. Professional competencies required to become a naval officer.
credit hours: 3

NAVS 1020 Seapower in History
Seapower in History
Freshman/Spring.  A survey of the U.S. naval history. Naval aspects of U.S. conflicts from the American Revolution to the global war on terror. The influence of technological innovation, domestic politics, and foreign policy on the development and execution of naval doctrine and tactics.
credit hours: 3

NAVS 2000 Leadership and Management
Leadership and Management
Sophomore/Fall.  Organizational behavior, management, and leadership principles in the context of naval organization. The management functions of planning, organizing, and controlling; individual and group behavior in organizations; motivation and leadership. Experiential exercises, case studies, and laboratory discussions. Decision making, communication, responsibility, authority, and accountability.
credit hours: 3

NAVS 2010 Ships Engineering Systems
Ships Engineering Systems
Junior/Fall.  A detailed study of ship characteristics and types, including ship design and control, propulsion, hydrodynamic forces, stability, compartmentation, and electrical and auxiliary systems. Included are basic concepts of the theory and design of steam, gas turbine, and nuclear propulsion.
credit hours: 3

NAVS 3010 Navigation I
Navigation I
Sophomore/Spring.  Students develop practical skills in naval piloting procedures. Charts, visual and electronic aids, and theory and operation of magnetic and gyro compasses; inland and international rules of the nautical road.   Basic principles of environmental factors affecting naval operations.
credit hours: 3

NAVS 3020 Naval Operations and Seamanship
Naval Operations and Seamanship
Senior/Fall.  Relative motion vector analysis theory, formation tactics, and ship employment; practical skills in relative motion problems. Controllable and noncontrollable forces in shiphandling, ship behavior, and maneuvering characteristics; various methods of visual communication, including flaghoist, flashing light, and semaphore.
credit hours: 3

NAVS 3030 Evolution of Warfare (Marine Option)
Evolution of Warfare (Marine Option)
This course traces the development of warfare, from earliest recorded history to the present, with focus on the impact of major military theorists, strategists, tacticians, and technological developments. The student acquires a basic sense of strategy and develops an understanding of military alternatives and the impact of historical precedent on military thought and actions.
credit hours: 3

NAVS 4010 Ships Weapons Systems
Ships Weapons Systems
Junior/Spring.  Theory and employment of weapons systems, including the processes of detection, evaluation, threat analysis, weapon selection, delivery, guidance, and explosives. Fire control systems and major weapons types, including capabilities and limitations. Physical aspects of radar and underwater sound. Facets of command, control, and communications as means of weapons system integration.
credit hours: 3

NAVS 4020 Leadership and Ethics
Leadership and Ethics
Senior/Spring.  The interaction of leadership, organizational behavior, and human resource management. Subordinate interviewing and counseling, performance appraisal, military and civilian law, and managerial ethics and values. This capstone course integrates professional competencies to develop understanding of the issues faced by leaders, managers, and naval officers.
credit hours: 3

NAVS 4030 Amphibious Warfare (Marine Option)
Amphibious Warfare (Marine Option)
A historical survey of the development of amphibious doctrine and the conduct of amphibious operations. The evolution of amphibious warfare in the 20th century, especially during World War II. Present-day potential and limitations on amphibious operations, including the concept of rapid deployment force.
credit hours: 3