Energy courses

ENRG 4100 Energy Markets, Economics, and Policy
Energy Markets, Economics, and Policy
The course covers a range of energy-related topics including major challenges and policy issues facing the industry, history of the industry, company profiles and strategies, energy economics, energy regulatory environment, energy markets, energy technology, and the environment and sustainable development. An executive speaker series is an integral component of the course. Students must complete a group paper and presentation as well as an individual paper on energy subject jointly agreed to by the professor and the student.
Notes: This course cannot be used as one of the three required finance electives towards the finance major. This course an be used as a business elective or free elective towards the BSM degree.
Pre-requistites: ECON 1020; sophomore standing or above.
credit hours: 3

ENRG 4200 Energy Fundamentals and Trading
Energy Fundamentals and Trading
This course will cover the fundamentals of energy production, transportation, refining and related marketing and trading activities. Structure of physical and financial markets, risk management practices, and portfolio modeling will be covered. The course will include interactive trading in the university's new state-of-the-art trading facility, which will focus on the futures market of the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) to test student developed trading strategies, mark-to-market models, options and risk management tactics used in today's fast-paced energy trading environment.
Notes: This course cannot be used as one of the three required finance electives towards the finance major. This course an be used as a business elective or free elective towards the BSM degree.
Pre-requistites: INFO 3010, FINE 3010; junior standing or above
credit hours: 3

ENRG 4410 Energy and Environmental Economics
Energy and Environmental Economics
This course provides an overview of the economic principles used in analyzing energy markets and environmental issues important to this sector. Students in this class will learn to apply fundamental tools of micro and macro-economics to study business and public policy issues involved in oil, natural gas, and electric industries including renewable energy sources. The course will cover the fundamentals of externalities in the energy industries and how to evaluate the impact of various environmental policies. They will evaluate incentives compatible mechanisms and efficient environmental regulation design. Students will study a numbers of industry specific cases and critically analyze typical problems in each industry. Students will apply economic reasoning to unravel popular fallacies and doomsday scenarios such as peak oil, fallacy of common-use resources, technical vs. economic potential of energy technologies.
Notes: This course cannot be used as one of the three required finance electives towards the finance major. This course an be used as a business elective or free elective towards the BSM degree.
Pre-requistites: ECON 1010, ECON 1020
Co-requisites: ENRG 4100
credit hours: 3

ENRG 4930 Introduction to Electric Power and Markets
Introduction to Electric Power and Markets
The number of players in power markets, player's competing interests and evolving regulatory policy gives electricity markets a unique niche in the world of commodity trading. The unique physical characteristics of its product, coupled with the nature of its delivery have created opportunities for trading shops and major corporations to rise and fall in a little more than a decade. As this market (slowly) matures, and regulation continues to improve market transparency and efficiency, it will be a bumpy ride. To better understand where these markets are going and where they have been, we shall first obtain a historical prospective. With a concrete understanding of the market evolution, we will then investigate what influence market prices on a long term, day ahead, and real time basis. We will also study the infamous market failures, and how regulators have responded to eliminate opportunities for indiscretion. The course will conclude with a brief look at several recent regulatory enactments to more closely align the interests of all market participants and stakeholders. This course will include market simulation exercises which will give students the opportunity to experience Power Marketing from the prospectives of a pure-marketer, independent power producer, and regulated utility.
Notes: This course cannot be used as one of the three required finance electives towards the finance major. This course an be used as a business elective or free elective towards the BSM degree.
Pre-requistites: ECON 1010, FINE 3010; junior standing or above
credit hours: 3